Ziprasidone kaufen online

Researchers from the Linda and Jack Gill Center for Biomolecular Science at Indiana University in Bloomington have identified the role that caffeine plays in boosting the activity levels of an enzyme known to combat dementia. Caffeine and 23 other compounds were found to interact with this enzyme, known as NMNAT2, to protect the brain against dementia and other neurodegenerative disorders. The study was published in the journal Scientific Reports.

According to the leader of the study, Hui-Chen Lu, the new research has the capability to increase the knowledge needed to develop drugs for boosting NMNAT2 in the brain, so as to block out the advances of brain disorders. Lu is a Gill Professor in the Linda and Jack Gill Center for Biomolecular Science and the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, a part of the IU Bloomington College of Arts and Sciences. She worked alongside Yousuf O. Ali, an assistant research scientist, and Gillian Bradley, a graduate student on the project.

Lu and her team of researchers analyzed over 1,280 compounds and drugs before zeroing in on caffeine and the 23 compounds. These compounds were found to boost the production and activity of NMNAT2 to fight off brain degeneration, IU Bloomington news release shows. The study was carried out on lab mice and the results found satisfactory before the authors of the study went public with their research.

Other compounds identified to boost the production of NMNAT2

Apart from the generally-known caffeine, another compound found to help the brain against degenerative factors is rolipram. This was an orphaned drug that was first developed for the treatment of depression, but it has also been found to reduce the effects of tangled proteins in the human brain. Other identified compounds are ziprasidone, cantharidin, wortmannin and retinoic acid among others.

Researcher Lu disclosed that her team was set up to identify the pathways that could be used to block degenerative factors in the brain. Beyond this, the team is also out to identify crucial compounds that could be used to develop drugs needed for treating debilitating mental disorders. So identifying the natural causes of brain decline is also as important as identifying the natural compounds needed to treat the condition.

The authors of the study called for more research into this subject to learn more on the roles of compounds on mental health, most especially dementia. This research was funded by the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the Belfer Family Foundation.

Charles Omedo can be contacted on [email protected] for web content jobs. He writes daily news articles for US/UK/Canadian clients and web articles/blog posts/product reviews on various topical niches for paying clients.

Article Source:
http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Charles_I._Omedo/174749

Researchers from the Linda and Jack Gill Center for Biomolecular Science at Indiana University in Bloomington have identified the role that caffeine plays in boosting the activity levels of an enzyme known to combat dementia. Caffeine and 23 other compounds were found to interact with this enzyme, known as NMNAT2, to protect the brain against dementia and other neurodegenerative disorders. The study was published in the journal Scientific Reports.

According to the leader of the study, Hui-Chen Lu, the new research has the capability to increase the knowledge needed to develop drugs for boosting NMNAT2 in the brain, so as to block out the advances of brain disorders. Lu is a Gill Professor in the Linda and Jack Gill Center for Biomolecular Science and the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, a part of the IU Bloomington College of Arts and Sciences. She worked alongside Yousuf O. Ali, an assistant research scientist, and Gillian Bradley, a graduate student on the project.

Lu and her team of researchers analyzed over 1,280 compounds and drugs before zeroing in on caffeine and the 23 compounds. These compounds were found to boost the production and activity of NMNAT2 to fight off brain degeneration, IU Bloomington news release shows. The study was carried out on lab mice and the results found satisfactory before the authors of the study went public with their research.

Other compounds identified to boost the production of NMNAT2

Apart from the generally-known caffeine, another compound found to help the brain against degenerative factors is rolipram. This was an orphaned drug that was first developed for the treatment of depression, but it has also been found to reduce the effects of tangled proteins in the human brain. Other identified compounds are ziprasidone, cantharidin, wortmannin and retinoic acid among others.

Researcher Lu disclosed that her team was set up to identify the pathways that could be used to block degenerative factors in the brain. Beyond this, the team is also out to identify crucial compounds that could be used to develop drugs needed for treating debilitating mental disorders. So identifying the natural causes of brain decline is also as important as identifying the natural compounds needed to treat the condition.

The authors of the study called for more research into this subject to learn more on the roles of compounds on mental health, most especially dementia. This research was funded by the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the Belfer Family Foundation.

Atypical, or second generation, antipsychotic medication is used for a variety of mental disorders. Those include schizophrenia, autism, bipolar disorder, and depression. At one time they were thought to be safer than typical, or first generation, antipsychotics but that has not always turned out to be the case. Investigators at the University of Kentucky in Lexington and various other research centers in the United States, compared children taking atypical antipsychotic medication with children not taking the medication to learn whether the medications could be linked with Type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents.

Their study, reported on in the journal Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety in March 2015, included…


6,236 children and adolescents between the ages of 4 and 18 taking second generation antipsychotics, and

22,080 children and adolescents not taking the medications.

It was found the participants taking atypical antipsychotics were more than twice as likely to develop Type 2 diabetes as their counterparts not taking the medications. From these results it was concluded there is reason for concern about the safety of using second generation antipsychotics in children and adolescents…


aripiprazole or Abilify, is prescribed along with antidepressants to help make them more effective. It is prescribed for people taking a class of antidepressants known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

asenapine maleate, or Saphris, is used to treat schizophrenia and bipolar (manic-depressive) disorder.

clozapine, also known as Clozaril, is indicated for treating schizophrenia and reducing the risk of suicide.

iloperidone, or Fanapt, is another drug for treating schizophrenia, as is lurasidone, or Latuda.

olanzapine, or Zyprexa antipsychotics, is another drug used to treat schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. When combined with fluoxetine it is known as Symbyax and used in the treatment of depression.

paliperidone or Invega, is used for treating schizophrenia as well as schizoaffective disorder.

quetiapine or Seroquel, is helpful in treating schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder.

risperidone or Risperdal, is used for bipolar disorder, and autism spectrum disorder.

Like most atypicals, ziprasidone or Geodon, is indicated for the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

Schizophrenia affects about 1 child in 10,000. Autism spectrum disorder is diagnosed in about 3.4 in a thousand children between the ages of 3 and 10. At any given time 1 in 10 children and adolescents suffers serious depression. Bipolar disorder can be seen in children as young as 6, although it more commonly appears in adolescents and young adults.

Although managing your disease can be very challenging, Type 2 diabetes is not a condition you must just live with. You can make simple changes to your daily routine and lower both your weight and your blood sugar levels. Hang in there, the longer you do it, the easier it gets.

For nearly 25 years Beverleigh Piepers has searched for and found a number of secrets to help you build a healthy body. Go to http://DrugFreeType2Diabetes.com to learn about some of those secrets.

The answer isn’t in the endless volumes of available information but in yourself.

Article Source:
http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Beverleigh_H_Piepers/123142

Researchers from the Linda and Jack Gill Center for Biomolecular Science at Indiana University in Bloomington have identified the role that caffeine plays in boosting the activity levels of an enzyme known to combat dementia. Caffeine and 23 other compounds were found to interact with this enzyme, known as NMNAT2, to protect the brain against dementia and other neurodegenerative disorders. The study was published in the journal Scientific Reports.

According to the leader of the study, Hui-Chen Lu, the new research has the capability to increase the knowledge needed to develop drugs for boosting NMNAT2 in the brain, so as to block out the advances of brain disorders. Lu is a Gill Professor in the Linda and Jack Gill Center for Biomolecular Science and the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, a part of the IU Bloomington College of Arts and Sciences. She worked alongside Yousuf O. Ali, an assistant research scientist, and Gillian Bradley, a graduate student on the project.

Lu and her team of researchers analyzed over 1,280 compounds and drugs before zeroing in on caffeine and the 23 compounds. These compounds were found to boost the production and activity of NMNAT2 to fight off brain degeneration, IU Bloomington news release shows. The study was carried out on lab mice and the results found satisfactory before the authors of the study went public with their research.

Other compounds identified to boost the production of NMNAT2

Apart from the generally-known caffeine, another compound found to help the brain against degenerative factors is rolipram. This was an orphaned drug that was first developed for the treatment of depression, but it has also been found to reduce the effects of tangled proteins in the human brain. Other identified compounds are ziprasidone, cantharidin, wortmannin and retinoic acid among others.

Researcher Lu disclosed that her team was set up to identify the pathways that could be used to block degenerative factors in the brain. Beyond this, the team is also out to identify crucial compounds that could be used to develop drugs needed for treating debilitating mental disorders. So identifying the natural causes of brain decline is also as important as identifying the natural compounds needed to treat the condition.

The authors of the study called for more research into this subject to learn more on the roles of compounds on mental health, most especially dementia. This research was funded by the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the Belfer Family Foundation.

Atypical, or second generation, antipsychotic medication is used for a variety of mental disorders. Those include schizophrenia, autism, bipolar disorder, and depression. At one time they were thought to be safer than typical, or first generation, antipsychotics but that has not always turned out to be the case. Investigators at the University of Kentucky in Lexington and various other research centers in the United States, compared children taking atypical antipsychotic medication with children not taking the medication to learn whether the medications could be linked with Type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents.

Their study, reported on in the journal Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety in March 2015, included…


6,236 children and adolescents between the ages of 4 and 18 taking second generation antipsychotics, and

22,080 children and adolescents not taking the medications.

It was found the participants taking atypical antipsychotics were more than twice as likely to develop Type 2 diabetes as their counterparts not taking the medications. From these results it was concluded there is reason for concern about the safety of using second generation antipsychotics in children and adolescents…


aripiprazole or Abilify, is prescribed along with antidepressants to help make them more effective. It is prescribed for people taking a class of antidepressants known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

asenapine maleate, or Saphris, is used to treat schizophrenia and bipolar (manic-depressive) disorder.

clozapine, also known as Clozaril, is indicated for treating schizophrenia and reducing the risk of suicide.

iloperidone, or Fanapt, is another drug for treating schizophrenia, as is lurasidone, or Latuda.

olanzapine, or Zyprexa antipsychotics, is another drug used to treat schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. When combined with fluoxetine it is known as Symbyax and used in the treatment of depression.

paliperidone or Invega, is used for treating schizophrenia as well as schizoaffective disorder.

quetiapine or Seroquel, is helpful in treating schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder.

risperidone or Risperdal, is used for bipolar disorder, and autism spectrum disorder.

Like most atypicals, ziprasidone or Geodon, is indicated for the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

Schizophrenia affects about 1 child in 10,000. Autism spectrum disorder is diagnosed in about 3.4 in a thousand children between the ages of 3 and 10. At any given time 1 in 10 children and adolescents suffers serious depression. Bipolar disorder can be seen in children as young as 6, although it more commonly appears in adolescents and young adults.

Certain medications used to treat schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are known to cause weight gain and insulin resistance. In 2007 scientists at Johns Hopkins Medical School in Maryland, USA, found that clozapine (Clozaril), a second generation antipsychotic drug, raised levels of an enzyme abbreviated AMPK in mice, causing their appetites to increase.

Researchers at British Columbia’s Children’s Hospital and the University of British Columbia in Canada looked at the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in children who had been treated with second generation antipsychotic drugs, and the results compared with the effects on children not treated with the drugs.

Their study, published in the Canadian Journal of Psychiatry in January 2012, included:

117 children who had been treated with second generation antipsychotic drugs, and
217 children who had not.

The metabolic syndrome was seen in 19 per cent of children who had been treated with the drugs and only.8 per cent of those who had not. Those taking second generation antipsychotics had more than a 29 per cent higher risk of metabolic syndrome than untreated children.

among drug-treated children, over 40 per cent had large waist measurements while only about 10 per cent of the untreated children had.
a high level of fats in their blood was seen in over 33 per cent of the treated children and only about 18 per cent of the untreated.
high blood sugar levels were measured in over 12 per cent of those taking antipsychotic drugs and only.7 per cent of the untreated children.
high blood pressure was found in over 41 per cent of the treated versus about 16 per cent of the untreated children.

From these results it was concluded children taking second generation antipsychotic drugs should be monitored closely for the metabolic syndrome.

The second generation antipsychotic medications include:

aripiprazole (Abilify),
olanzapine (Zyprexa),
paliperidone (Invega),
quetiapine (Seroquel),
risperidone (Risperdal), and
ziprasidone (Geodon).

They are thought to work by affecting molecules called neurtotransmitters, which carry messages from one brain cell to another. They frequently rid patients of the hallucinations, flat emotions, and lack of motivation seen in schizophrenia. Side effects include fatigue, weight gain, high cholesterol, and high blood sugar. The makers of risperidone, olanzapine, and quetiapone warn patients taking their medications their risk of developing high blood sugar or Type 2 diabetes can increase.

Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are serious conditions that must be treated but patients, their parents, and their medical advisors need to watch carefully for:

Type 2 diabetes,
overweight and obesity,
high cholesterol,
high blood fats, and
high blood pressure.

If you or a member of your family is taking second generation antipsychotics, be sure to ask your doctor to monitor your:

blood sugar levels,
blood fats and cholesterol,
blood pressure, weight, and
waist size.

The metabolic syndrome is sometimes referred to as syndrome X or the insulin resistance syndrome. The earliest abnormality in Type 2 diabetes is insulin resistance, which is found in people even before diabetes can be diagnosed.

To discover answers to questions you may be asking yourself about Type 2 Diabetes, click on this link… Natural Diabetes Treatments

Clicking on this link will help you to learn more about Type 2 Diabetes Solutions… Beverleigh Piepers RN… the Diabetes Detective.

Beverleigh Piepers is the author of this article. This article can be used for reprint on your website provided all the links in the article are complete and active. Copyright (c) 2011 – All Rights Reserved Worldwide

Article Source:
http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Beverleigh_H_Piepers/123142

Researchers from the Linda and Jack Gill Center for Biomolecular Science at Indiana University in Bloomington have identified the role that caffeine plays in boosting the activity levels of an enzyme known to combat dementia. Caffeine and 23 other compounds were found to interact with this enzyme, known as NMNAT2, to protect the brain against dementia and other neurodegenerative disorders. The study was published in the journal Scientific Reports.

According to the leader of the study, Hui-Chen Lu, the new research has the capability to increase the knowledge needed to develop drugs for boosting NMNAT2 in the brain, so as to block out the advances of brain disorders. Lu is a Gill Professor in the Linda and Jack Gill Center for Biomolecular Science and the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, a part of the IU Bloomington College of Arts and Sciences. She worked alongside Yousuf O. Ali, an assistant research scientist, and Gillian Bradley, a graduate student on the project.

Lu and her team of researchers analyzed over 1,280 compounds and drugs before zeroing in on caffeine and the 23 compounds. These compounds were found to boost the production and activity of NMNAT2 to fight off brain degeneration, IU Bloomington news release shows. The study was carried out on lab mice and the results found satisfactory before the authors of the study went public with their research.

Other compounds identified to boost the production of NMNAT2

Apart from the generally-known caffeine, another compound found to help the brain against degenerative factors is rolipram. This was an orphaned drug that was first developed for the treatment of depression, but it has also been found to reduce the effects of tangled proteins in the human brain. Other identified compounds are ziprasidone, cantharidin, wortmannin and retinoic acid among others.

Researcher Lu disclosed that her team was set up to identify the pathways that could be used to block degenerative factors in the brain. Beyond this, the team is also out to identify crucial compounds that could be used to develop drugs needed for treating debilitating mental disorders. So identifying the natural causes of brain decline is also as important as identifying the natural compounds needed to treat the condition.

The authors of the study called for more research into this subject to learn more on the roles of compounds on mental health, most especially dementia. This research was funded by the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the Belfer Family Foundation.

Atypical, or second generation, antipsychotic medication is used for a variety of mental disorders. Those include schizophrenia, autism, bipolar disorder, and depression. At one time they were thought to be safer than typical, or first generation, antipsychotics but that has not always turned out to be the case. Investigators at the University of Kentucky in Lexington and various other research centers in the United States, compared children taking atypical antipsychotic medication with children not taking the medication to learn whether the medications could be linked with Type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents.

Their study, reported on in the journal Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety in March 2015, included…


6,236 children and adolescents between the ages of 4 and 18 taking second generation antipsychotics, and

22,080 children and adolescents not taking the medications.

It was found the participants taking atypical antipsychotics were more than twice as likely to develop Type 2 diabetes as their counterparts not taking the medications. From these results it was concluded there is reason for concern about the safety of using second generation antipsychotics in children and adolescents…


aripiprazole or Abilify, is prescribed along with antidepressants to help make them more effective. It is prescribed for people taking a class of antidepressants known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

asenapine maleate, or Saphris, is used to treat schizophrenia and bipolar (manic-depressive) disorder.

clozapine, also known as Clozaril, is indicated for treating schizophrenia and reducing the risk of suicide.

iloperidone, or Fanapt, is another drug for treating schizophrenia, as is lurasidone, or Latuda.

olanzapine, or Zyprexa antipsychotics, is another drug used to treat schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. When combined with fluoxetine it is known as Symbyax and used in the treatment of depression.

paliperidone or Invega, is used for treating schizophrenia as well as schizoaffective disorder.

quetiapine or Seroquel, is helpful in treating schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder.

risperidone or Risperdal, is used for bipolar disorder, and autism spectrum disorder.

Like most atypicals, ziprasidone or Geodon, is indicated for the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

Schizophrenia affects about 1 child in 10,000. Autism spectrum disorder is diagnosed in about 3.4 in a thousand children between the ages of 3 and 10. At any given time 1 in 10 children and adolescents suffers serious depression. Bipolar disorder can be seen in children as young as 6, although it more commonly appears in adolescents and young adults.

Certain medications used to treat schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are known to cause weight gain and insulin resistance. In 2007 scientists at Johns Hopkins Medical School in Maryland, USA, found that clozapine (Clozaril), a second generation antipsychotic drug, raised levels of an enzyme abbreviated AMPK in mice, causing their appetites to increase.

Researchers at British Columbia’s Children’s Hospital and the University of British Columbia in Canada looked at the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in children who had been treated with second generation antipsychotic drugs, and the results compared with the effects on children not treated with the drugs.

Their study, published in the Canadian Journal of Psychiatry in January 2012, included:

117 children who had been treated with second generation antipsychotic drugs, and
217 children who had not.

The metabolic syndrome was seen in 19 per cent of children who had been treated with the drugs and only.8 per cent of those who had not. Those taking second generation antipsychotics had more than a 29 per cent higher risk of metabolic syndrome than untreated children.

among drug-treated children, over 40 per cent had large waist measurements while only about 10 per cent of the untreated children had.
a high level of fats in their blood was seen in over 33 per cent of the treated children and only about 18 per cent of the untreated.
high blood sugar levels were measured in over 12 per cent of those taking antipsychotic drugs and only.7 per cent of the untreated children.
high blood pressure was found in over 41 per cent of the treated versus about 16 per cent of the untreated children.

From these results it was concluded children taking second generation antipsychotic drugs should be monitored closely for the metabolic syndrome.

The second generation antipsychotic medications include:

aripiprazole (Abilify),
olanzapine (Zyprexa),
paliperidone (Invega),
quetiapine (Seroquel),
risperidone (Risperdal), and
ziprasidone (Geodon).

They are thought to work by affecting molecules called neurtotransmitters, which carry messages from one brain cell to another. They frequently rid patients of the hallucinations, flat emotions, and lack of motivation seen in schizophrenia. Side effects include fatigue, weight gain, high cholesterol, and high blood sugar. The makers of risperidone, olanzapine, and quetiapone warn patients taking their medications their risk of developing high blood sugar or Type 2 diabetes can increase.

Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are serious conditions that must be treated but patients, their parents, and their medical advisors need to watch carefully for:

Type 2 diabetes,
overweight and obesity,
high cholesterol,
high blood fats, and
high blood pressure.

If you or a member of your family is taking second generation antipsychotics, be sure to ask your doctor to monitor your:

blood sugar levels,
blood fats and cholesterol,
blood pressure, weight, and
waist size.

The metabolic syndrome is sometimes referred to as syndrome X or the insulin resistance syndrome. The earliest abnormality in Type 2 diabetes is insulin resistance, which is found in people even before diabetes can be diagnosed.

What is Biploar Disorder?
Bipolar or manic depressive illness is a brain disorder that causes a typical changes in mood, energy and activity levels. Bipolar 1 disorder is diagnosed as having manic or mixed episodes, which are not normal of the person’s behaviour. The episodes last for at least a week and require medical attention. The person also experiences depressive episodes, which last approximately two weeks. In between the cycling of manic and depression, many can live normal lives. Symptoms first appear in teens or early 20s, with many developing the disorder before the age of 50.

Bipolar Disorder Medications
Many different medications are needed for the best course of treatment as patients respond to the drugs differently. The medication should be taken continuously for the prevention of a relapse. Manic episodes in bipolar I disorder require treatment with drugs, such as antidepressants, mood stabilizers, benzodiazepines, and newer antipyschotics.

To track and treat the illness, the patient carries out a daily life chart of their mood symptoms, treatments, sleeping patterns and life events. Usually, the first choice of treatment is the long term use of mood stabilisers. With the exception of lithium, they are anticonvulsants to treat seizures as well as controlling mood. There are many types of mood stabilisers on the market. Lithium was the first to be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It is frequently effective in controlling the symptoms of mania, and preventing the recurrence of manic and depressive episodes.

Valproic acid is as effective as lithium for treating mania. Lamotrigine is the more recent for maintaining the treatment. Less prescribed anticonvulsants include gabapentin, topiramate and oxcarbazepine as they are not more effective than the mood stabilisers. It is thought that by taking valproic acid, lamotrigine and other anticonvulsants, it increases the risk of suicidal thoughts and behaviours and therefore patients are closely monitored.

In addition to the disorder, patients often have problems with their thyroid gland. The overproduction or underproduction of the thyroid hormone can lead to mood and energy changes. It has been seen that hypothyroidism is associated with the rapid cycling of the bipolar disorder, occurring especially in women.

Atypical antipsychotic drugs are often used for treatment. They are usually taken with other drugs. These include: olanzapine, which is given with an antidepressant to help relieve symptoms of severe mania or psychosis. It can also be given intravenously to treat agitation of manic or mixed episodes. Aripiprazole has the same effect as olanzapine as well maintaining treatment after a severe or sudden episode. Quetiapine relieves the symptoms of severe and sudden manic episodes. Risperidone and ziprasidone are also prescribed for controlling manic or mixed episodes.

Other treatments include:
Psychotherapy to educate, support and provide guidance to people with the disorder and their families. A study carried out by NIMH had found that patients that were treated with medication and extensive psychotherapy, underwent fewer relapses, fewer admissions to hospitals, and were able to stick to treatment plans.

Electroconvulsive therapy is used to treat severely depressive, manic or mixed episodes. It is not usually given as a first line of treatment.

[http://www.currenthealthissues.org]

[http://www.currenthealthissues.org/index.php/2011/07/bipolar-1-disorder-the-manic-episode/]

Article Source:
http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Kabir_Khan/1135142

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *