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The dramatic symptoms of asthma including coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, and difficulty breathing are caused by three events in the airways:

the lining of the airways beginning to swell
mucus being secreted
the muscles that surround the airway going into spasm

There are two types of asthma inhalers called bronchodilators that counteract all three of these events and open (dilate) your airways (bronchi).

Controller Inhalers

Sometimes called preventers, these inhalers are used every day to reduce inflammation. If you have been diagnosed with asthma, your airways will always be more swollen than those of somebody without the condition. By using an asthma controller each morning and evening, you can reduce that baseline swelling in your airways. If you now come across an asthma trigger causing your airways to swell even more, the resulting inflammation will not be as severe. Controller inhalers can also make you less reactive to those triggers.

The most effective controller inhalers use low doses of steroids called corticosteroids. They should be used every day even if you are feeling well; otherwise the asthma symptoms can come back. There also exist combination inhalers which include steroid prevention medication along with a long-lasting reliever medication.

Reliever Inhalers

These emergency inhalers are often referred to as rescue inhalers. They are to be used only when you feel your airways tighten and it is hard to breathe. Your symptoms will go away fast and you will feel instant relief. These inhalers work by relaxing the muscles around the airways making the airways wider. They do not however, have an effect on inflammation or build up of mucus; so you must continue to take your controller medication for those. You can use a rescue inhaler up to four times a day until your symptoms subside. You may also be advised by your doctor to use the inhaler before sports or other activities.

MDI

Of the more popular types of inhalers are MDI’s, or metered dose inhalers. The medicine is in the form of a mist and comes out when you press down the inhaler. You may want to use a spacer, sometimes referred to as a holding chamber with your metered device which enables the medicine to reach deep into your airways with less remaining in your mouth. A spacer helps reduce the risk of side effects of bronchodilators including hoarseness or irritation of the throat or tongue.

Controller and reliever inhalers work the same way though the medicine inside is for different purposes. To make distinguishing between the two easier, rescue inhalers are blue while controller inhalers come most often in orange and brown but are available in purple and red.

 

As effective as asthma inhalers can be for temporary relief, are tired of having to rely on them? Check out an alternative program called Asthma Free Forever. It is an all-natural way to cure asthma and has worked for thousands of people.

The dramatic symptoms of asthma including coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, and difficulty breathing are caused by three events in the airways:

the lining of the airways beginning to swell
mucus being secreted
the muscles that surround the airway going into spasm

There are two types of asthma inhalers called bronchodilators that counteract all three of these events and open (dilate) your airways (bronchi).

Controller Inhalers

Sometimes called preventers, these inhalers are used every day to reduce inflammation. If you have been diagnosed with asthma, your airways will always be more swollen than those of somebody without the condition. By using an asthma controller each morning and evening, you can reduce that baseline swelling in your airways. If you now come across an asthma trigger causing your airways to swell even more, the resulting inflammation will not be as severe. Controller inhalers can also make you less reactive to those triggers.

The most effective controller inhalers use low doses of steroids called corticosteroids. They should be used every day even if you are feeling well; otherwise the asthma symptoms can come back. There also exist combination inhalers which include steroid prevention medication along with a long-lasting reliever medication.

Reliever Inhalers

These emergency inhalers are often referred to as rescue inhalers. They are to be used only when you feel your airways tighten and it is hard to breathe. Your symptoms will go away fast and you will feel instant relief. These inhalers work by relaxing the muscles around the airways making the airways wider. They do not however, have an effect on inflammation or build up of mucus; so you must continue to take your controller medication for those. You can use a rescue inhaler up to four times a day until your symptoms subside. You may also be advised by your doctor to use the inhaler before sports or other activities.

MDI

Of the more popular types of inhalers are MDI’s, or metered dose inhalers. The medicine is in the form of a mist and comes out when you press down the inhaler. You may want to use a spacer, sometimes referred to as a holding chamber with your metered device which enables the medicine to reach deep into your airways with less remaining in your mouth. A spacer helps reduce the risk of side effects of bronchodilators including hoarseness or irritation of the throat or tongue.

Controller and reliever inhalers work the same way though the medicine inside is for different purposes. To make distinguishing between the two easier, rescue inhalers are blue while controller inhalers come most often in orange and brown but are available in purple and red.

 

Asbestos is the name for a group of six naturally occurring silicates that are composed of bundled fibers. Asbestos doesn’t conduct electricity and the asbestos threads are resistant to fire, chemicals and heat.

For many years these fibers were commercially separated into threads that were then used in the manufacture of building materials.

Although on the surface asbestos solves many challenges associated with building construction, it has a very major downside. That is when asbestos fibers are inhaled or swallowed they can cause life-threatening diseases.

When materials that contains asbestos are disturbed, the disturbance has the potential to cause the release asbestos dust and miniscule asbestos fibers into the air. Then, if these nearly indestructible fibers lodge themselves in a person’s body, they ultimately can cause inflammation, scarring, and a number of nonmalignant as well as malignant conditions.

Some diseases that are caused by asbestos are asbestosis, pleural disease, and mesothelioma.

There is a very good chance that almost everyone who lives in an industrialized country has been exposed to asbestos at one point or another in their lives. Yet many of them have not become ill from their exposure.

That’s because the health risks associated with asbestos inhalation are usually (but not always) amplified by increased lengths of time and increased concentrations of exposure to the fibers.

It is also worth noting that if a person smokes, the likelihood that asbestos exposure will harm them is significantly increased.

The first link of asbestos inhalation to lung disease was found in 1890. By 1907, asbestos exposure related deaths were already being reported. By the end of the twentieth century asbestosis and lung cancer that was related to asbestos inhalation was dramatically on the rise in the United States. And now instances of malignant mesothelioma are increasing in many countries throughout the world.

Malignant mesothelioma is a type of asbestos cancer that usually develops from fifteen to fifty years after asbestos fibers have been inhaled.

Many people think that there are laws that prevent asbestos from being used in any products that are manufactured in the United States. However, that is not the case. There are still many industries in the US that expose their employees to the potential of asbestos inhalation.

People who work in shipyards, auto mechanics, in aircraft manufacturing, refineries, on railroads, in construction, or as firefighters or rescue personnel are all potentially being exposed to asbestos every day that they work.

In addition, building demolition workers, employees of textile mills that weave asbestos into cloth, asbestos mines, asbestos millers, asbestos transport workers, and more are exposed to this potentially deadly mineral whenever they “punch the time clock”.

Even people who do not work in an asbestos related industry are still at risk. Although some materials that contain asbestos are now regulated or banned, a lot of it is still present in old buildings. The asbestos in these buildings can be released during repair, maintenance, or renovation, subjecting both workers and the building’s occupants to exposure to asbestos dust.

And if the building is demolished asbestos may be released into the air. If that happens both passersby as well as all of the residents of nearby buildings could be at risk of asbestos exposure .

Talk to a mesothelioma attorney at http://www.asbestos.net/asbestos-legal-issues/mesothelioma-asbestos-and-other-asbestos-diseases-lawyers-and-attorneys.html Wendy Moyer on behalf of Sokolove Law.

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