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I conclude with some general thoughts about how a shift in the meaning of value can bridge some of the divisions between English studies and composition/rhetoric. As we have seen, when value is framed strictly in terms of exchange-value (exchanging one text for another), a certain set of expectations/practices seems to be put into place. The principal agents become the professors and students; the principal site of activity is the university.

In this class, the knowledge students have gained outside of class—about the U.S. Civil Rights movement, about Vietnam, about military families with soldiers overseas—is invited into the class to bring life to historical documents that may seem impenetrable. Rather than shielding students from the hard work of academic literacy until they demonstrate the capability to Links Of London comprehend such texts on their own, actually engaging them in academic reading, with expert teacher support and a collaborative learning environment, is seen as the most important way to build young people’s capability.

However, with the introduction of use-value as a guiding metaphor, a different set of interests becomes part of the equation, forcing a different set of responsibilities onto the institution. It becomes possible to imagine each partner (the university and the community) as providing value to the project and being accorded the right to determine its use. Value production can be seen as a communal process, the aim of which is to produce a mutually reaffirming literacy product. Invoking use-value as an organizing principle demands that a common (if contentious) space of negotiation and production be created. For this reason, I believe that curriculum reform must be more than the simple inclusion of texts that represent “alternative values;” it must mean more than providing diverse texts for students to judge by some moral standard or to use to learn academic discourse. This is important work, but it is only one piece. One of the goals of English studies, and of composition/rhetoric programs in particular, is to help students understand the connections between language and cultural power.

Michelle Kehm tries to create a modern-day Nancy Drew mystery with Suzi Clue: The Prom Queen Curse. Suzi is a tenacious character who will stop at nothing to solve the mystery of the curse. This book revolves around the theme of being perfect. The counterpoint is Suzi Clue. She does not want to be perfect; in fact, she tries to go against the mold as much as possible. However, the school and its patrons value the “perfect” BGs: Gigi and her circle of friends. The author illustrates the lengths that people will go to for perfection or to destroy it. Although the Links Of London Bracelets conflict is obviously implausible, the story is still entertaining as Suzi races against the clock to try to solve the mystery of the prom queen curse.

To do this most effectively, English studies must create a path for students that is based in both traditional course offerings (which teach the history of literary texts, cultural theory, key concepts in rhetoric, ethnography, and linguistics) and in courses that engage students in the informed production of use-value; that is, in addition to traditional courses, students must participate in both the creation of the aesthetic written object and the economy of partnerships out of which it emerges. Ultimately, the work of producing collaborative publications between the university and their local communities, socializing and expanding the aesthetic means of production, should become a key element of our pedagogical and professional work. Community publishing projects are a primary vehicle for such work.

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I conclude with some general thoughts about how a shift in the meaning of value can bridge some of the divisions between English studies and composition/rhetoric. As we have seen, when value is framed strictly in terms of exchange-value (exchanging one text for another), a certain set of expectations/practices seems to be put into place. The principal agents become the professors and students; the principal site of activity is the university.

In this class, the knowledge students have gained outside of class—about the U.S. Civil Rights movement, about Vietnam, about military families with soldiers overseas—is invited into the class to bring life to historical documents that may seem impenetrable. Rather than shielding students from the hard work of academic literacy until they demonstrate the capability to Links Of London comprehend such texts on their own, actually engaging them in academic reading, with expert teacher support and a collaborative learning environment, is seen as the most important way to build young people’s capability.

However, with the introduction of use-value as a guiding metaphor, a different set of interests becomes part of the equation, forcing a different set of responsibilities onto the institution. It becomes possible to imagine each partner (the university and the community) as providing value to the project and being accorded the right to determine its use. Value production can be seen as a communal process, the aim of which is to produce a mutually reaffirming literacy product. Invoking use-value as an organizing principle demands that a common (if contentious) space of negotiation and production be created. For this reason, I believe that curriculum reform must be more than the simple inclusion of texts that represent “alternative values;” it must mean more than providing diverse texts for students to judge by some moral standard or to use to learn academic discourse. This is important work, but it is only one piece. One of the goals of English studies, and of composition/rhetoric programs in particular, is to help students understand the connections between language and cultural power.

Michelle Kehm tries to create a modern-day Nancy Drew mystery with Suzi Clue: The Prom Queen Curse. Suzi is a tenacious character who will stop at nothing to solve the mystery of the curse. This book revolves around the theme of being perfect. The counterpoint is Suzi Clue. She does not want to be perfect; in fact, she tries to go against the mold as much as possible. However, the school and its patrons value the “perfect” BGs: Gigi and her circle of friends. The author illustrates the lengths that people will go to for perfection or to destroy it. Although the Links Of London Bracelets conflict is obviously implausible, the story is still entertaining as Suzi races against the clock to try to solve the mystery of the prom queen curse.

To do this most effectively, English studies must create a path for students that is based in both traditional course offerings (which teach the history of literary texts, cultural theory, key concepts in rhetoric, ethnography, and linguistics) and in courses that engage students in the informed production of use-value; that is, in addition to traditional courses, students must participate in both the creation of the aesthetic written object and the economy of partnerships out of which it emerges. Ultimately, the work of producing collaborative publications between the university and their local communities, socializing and expanding the aesthetic means of production, should become a key element of our pedagogical and professional work. Community publishing projects are a primary vehicle for such work.

I have just returned form my fifth sacred kinesiology appointment. As on all the previous occasions, again, I have asked my Gypsy cards: what energies that no longer serve me have I released? Or, alternatively, what good energies have I made room for by having released something that no longer serves me?

Having shuffled the cards well, I drew the Fortune, the Sweetheart and the House cards. The message of this triple combination came to me immediately: I should allow masculine energies to bring me fortune and safety. In other words, clean masculine energies will lead to safety.

So, how does this strange message resonate with me? I don’t think that the combination alludes to a specific man. Rather, it talks about masculine energies in general that we women also have. Thinking like a man with our brain (and I am grossly generalizing here), rather than with our heart is often useful especially in this modern world and lifestyle. There are aspects of our life, especially money (Fortune), that need to be handled with a business rationale which I associate with masculine resonances. Thinking about finances with more determination and logic will ensure financial safety on the long run (House – safety of any kind).

Money is a touchy subject that we treat too emotionally instead of with the rational importance it craves. We scornfully reject it with an exaggerated pride in our emotional values at moments that have to do neither with pride nor with emotions. We feel that our heart should always rule us although we are given a strong brain exactly for moments when it is rational thinking that would serve us better.

These cards indicate that after a life-long battle around the concept of money, I have finally made peace with money. I like it, and when I think of it, I think of it with the importance money enjoys. I invite it into my life, and when it arrives, I welcome it, enjoy it, structure it, see how it serves me the best on the long run, and most of all, I feel no guilt for having it.

Money is a tool for safety that likes to be treated with loving rationality. Our life is not only about our heart and the ideal; at times it is about our brain and the practical.

A friend of mine always says: treat money with the attention and the respect it deserves; because money talks, and the first thing it says is “goodbye”.

Esther Gombor, a Hungarian-born romantic, has managed to finally dispel the mysteries surrounding her own life and everyone else’s who has asked for her help. She is the author of the book: Fortune Telling with Gypsy cards; Dispel the Mysteries Surrounding Life and Romance. Her fabulous guide to reading illustrated fortune telling cards is the crystallized essence of her native Hungarian culture, her extensive traveling throughout Europe and her Master’s degree in Italian Medieval and Renaissance literature. Although she lives in Toronto, Canada, where she writes, she spends most of her summers in her native country to keep on researching more secrets for her next book.

I conclude with some general thoughts about how a shift in the meaning of value can bridge some of the divisions between English studies and composition/rhetoric. As we have seen, when value is framed strictly in terms of exchange-value (exchanging one text for another), a certain set of expectations/practices seems to be put into place. The principal agents become the professors and students; the principal site of activity is the university.

In this class, the knowledge students have gained outside of class—about the U.S. Civil Rights movement, about Vietnam, about military families with soldiers overseas—is invited into the class to bring life to historical documents that may seem impenetrable. Rather than shielding students from the hard work of academic literacy until they demonstrate the capability to Links Of London comprehend such texts on their own, actually engaging them in academic reading, with expert teacher support and a collaborative learning environment, is seen as the most important way to build young people’s capability.

However, with the introduction of use-value as a guiding metaphor, a different set of interests becomes part of the equation, forcing a different set of responsibilities onto the institution. It becomes possible to imagine each partner (the university and the community) as providing value to the project and being accorded the right to determine its use. Value production can be seen as a communal process, the aim of which is to produce a mutually reaffirming literacy product. Invoking use-value as an organizing principle demands that a common (if contentious) space of negotiation and production be created. For this reason, I believe that curriculum reform must be more than the simple inclusion of texts that represent “alternative values;” it must mean more than providing diverse texts for students to judge by some moral standard or to use to learn academic discourse. This is important work, but it is only one piece. One of the goals of English studies, and of composition/rhetoric programs in particular, is to help students understand the connections between language and cultural power.

Michelle Kehm tries to create a modern-day Nancy Drew mystery with Suzi Clue: The Prom Queen Curse. Suzi is a tenacious character who will stop at nothing to solve the mystery of the curse. This book revolves around the theme of being perfect. The counterpoint is Suzi Clue. She does not want to be perfect; in fact, she tries to go against the mold as much as possible. However, the school and its patrons value the “perfect” BGs: Gigi and her circle of friends. The author illustrates the lengths that people will go to for perfection or to destroy it. Although the Links Of London Bracelets conflict is obviously implausible, the story is still entertaining as Suzi races against the clock to try to solve the mystery of the prom queen curse.

To do this most effectively, English studies must create a path for students that is based in both traditional course offerings (which teach the history of literary texts, cultural theory, key concepts in rhetoric, ethnography, and linguistics) and in courses that engage students in the informed production of use-value; that is, in addition to traditional courses, students must participate in both the creation of the aesthetic written object and the economy of partnerships out of which it emerges. Ultimately, the work of producing collaborative publications between the university and their local communities, socializing and expanding the aesthetic means of production, should become a key element of our pedagogical and professional work. Community publishing projects are a primary vehicle for such work.

I have just returned form my fifth sacred kinesiology appointment. As on all the previous occasions, again, I have asked my Gypsy cards: what energies that no longer serve me have I released? Or, alternatively, what good energies have I made room for by having released something that no longer serves me?

Having shuffled the cards well, I drew the Fortune, the Sweetheart and the House cards. The message of this triple combination came to me immediately: I should allow masculine energies to bring me fortune and safety. In other words, clean masculine energies will lead to safety.

So, how does this strange message resonate with me? I don’t think that the combination alludes to a specific man. Rather, it talks about masculine energies in general that we women also have. Thinking like a man with our brain (and I am grossly generalizing here), rather than with our heart is often useful especially in this modern world and lifestyle. There are aspects of our life, especially money (Fortune), that need to be handled with a business rationale which I associate with masculine resonances. Thinking about finances with more determination and logic will ensure financial safety on the long run (House – safety of any kind).

Money is a touchy subject that we treat too emotionally instead of with the rational importance it craves. We scornfully reject it with an exaggerated pride in our emotional values at moments that have to do neither with pride nor with emotions. We feel that our heart should always rule us although we are given a strong brain exactly for moments when it is rational thinking that would serve us better.

These cards indicate that after a life-long battle around the concept of money, I have finally made peace with money. I like it, and when I think of it, I think of it with the importance money enjoys. I invite it into my life, and when it arrives, I welcome it, enjoy it, structure it, see how it serves me the best on the long run, and most of all, I feel no guilt for having it.

Money is a tool for safety that likes to be treated with loving rationality. Our life is not only about our heart and the ideal; at times it is about our brain and the practical.

A friend of mine always says: treat money with the attention and the respect it deserves; because money talks, and the first thing it says is “goodbye”.

The following superfoods are smart, low-calorie choices that will benefit your weight loss efforts: 

Green Tea – Researchers suspect that the catechins (helpful phytochemicals) in green tea may trigger weight loss by stimulating the body to burn calories and mildly decrease body fat. So indulge in either a hot cup or a nice tall iced glass of green tea.

Broth- or tomato-based soup – Soups can help reduce hunger before meals and increase your feeling of fullness. 

Low-calorie green salads – Having a low-calorie salad – which is not defined as one that’s loaded with croutons, high fat dressings, and cheese – as a first course can help you feel full, thereby reducing how much you eat with your main course.  Wisely choose your ingredients, and its high fiber content can be the key to helping you fight cravings later in the day.

Yogurt – Including dairy products as part of your healthy diet may promote your weight loss efforts.  Choosing a light yogurt may help you fight off hunger pangs due to its combination of protein and carbohydrate.

Beans – A great combination of fiber and protein, beans help you feel full longer, which means they may work to curb your between-meal appetite.

Water – Water is your body’s lifeblood, and you should be drinking it through your day. It’s a great no-calorie beverage, and you can get it by drinking unsweetened tea, flavored unsweetened mineral water, regular water with lime or lemon, or even in your cucumber.  In addition to helping flush toxins from the body, it can also help you feel full.  So when those hunger pangs strike, try drinking a glass of water before grabbing that snack.

High-Fiber, Whole-Grain Cereal – Whole grains in general help boost fiber and the nutritional value of your meal.  One of the easiest ways to give your daily diet a whole-grain boost is to have a bowl of higher-fiber whole-grain cereal as breakfast or a snack.

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I conclude with some general thoughts about how a shift in the meaning of value can bridge some of the divisions between English studies and composition/rhetoric. As we have seen, when value is framed strictly in terms of exchange-value (exchanging one text for another), a certain set of expectations/practices seems to be put into place. The principal agents become the professors and students; the principal site of activity is the university.

In this class, the knowledge students have gained outside of class—about the U.S. Civil Rights movement, about Vietnam, about military families with soldiers overseas—is invited into the class to bring life to historical documents that may seem impenetrable. Rather than shielding students from the hard work of academic literacy until they demonstrate the capability to Links Of London comprehend such texts on their own, actually engaging them in academic reading, with expert teacher support and a collaborative learning environment, is seen as the most important way to build young people’s capability.

However, with the introduction of use-value as a guiding metaphor, a different set of interests becomes part of the equation, forcing a different set of responsibilities onto the institution. It becomes possible to imagine each partner (the university and the community) as providing value to the project and being accorded the right to determine its use. Value production can be seen as a communal process, the aim of which is to produce a mutually reaffirming literacy product. Invoking use-value as an organizing principle demands that a common (if contentious) space of negotiation and production be created. For this reason, I believe that curriculum reform must be more than the simple inclusion of texts that represent “alternative values;” it must mean more than providing diverse texts for students to judge by some moral standard or to use to learn academic discourse. This is important work, but it is only one piece. One of the goals of English studies, and of composition/rhetoric programs in particular, is to help students understand the connections between language and cultural power.

Michelle Kehm tries to create a modern-day Nancy Drew mystery with Suzi Clue: The Prom Queen Curse. Suzi is a tenacious character who will stop at nothing to solve the mystery of the curse. This book revolves around the theme of being perfect. The counterpoint is Suzi Clue. She does not want to be perfect; in fact, she tries to go against the mold as much as possible. However, the school and its patrons value the “perfect” BGs: Gigi and her circle of friends. The author illustrates the lengths that people will go to for perfection or to destroy it. Although the Links Of London Bracelets conflict is obviously implausible, the story is still entertaining as Suzi races against the clock to try to solve the mystery of the prom queen curse.

To do this most effectively, English studies must create a path for students that is based in both traditional course offerings (which teach the history of literary texts, cultural theory, key concepts in rhetoric, ethnography, and linguistics) and in courses that engage students in the informed production of use-value; that is, in addition to traditional courses, students must participate in both the creation of the aesthetic written object and the economy of partnerships out of which it emerges. Ultimately, the work of producing collaborative publications between the university and their local communities, socializing and expanding the aesthetic means of production, should become a key element of our pedagogical and professional work. Community publishing projects are a primary vehicle for such work.

I have just returned form my fifth sacred kinesiology appointment. As on all the previous occasions, again, I have asked my Gypsy cards: what energies that no longer serve me have I released? Or, alternatively, what good energies have I made room for by having released something that no longer serves me?

Having shuffled the cards well, I drew the Fortune, the Sweetheart and the House cards. The message of this triple combination came to me immediately: I should allow masculine energies to bring me fortune and safety. In other words, clean masculine energies will lead to safety.

So, how does this strange message resonate with me? I don’t think that the combination alludes to a specific man. Rather, it talks about masculine energies in general that we women also have. Thinking like a man with our brain (and I am grossly generalizing here), rather than with our heart is often useful especially in this modern world and lifestyle. There are aspects of our life, especially money (Fortune), that need to be handled with a business rationale which I associate with masculine resonances. Thinking about finances with more determination and logic will ensure financial safety on the long run (House – safety of any kind).

Money is a touchy subject that we treat too emotionally instead of with the rational importance it craves. We scornfully reject it with an exaggerated pride in our emotional values at moments that have to do neither with pride nor with emotions. We feel that our heart should always rule us although we are given a strong brain exactly for moments when it is rational thinking that would serve us better.

These cards indicate that after a life-long battle around the concept of money, I have finally made peace with money. I like it, and when I think of it, I think of it with the importance money enjoys. I invite it into my life, and when it arrives, I welcome it, enjoy it, structure it, see how it serves me the best on the long run, and most of all, I feel no guilt for having it.

Money is a tool for safety that likes to be treated with loving rationality. Our life is not only about our heart and the ideal; at times it is about our brain and the practical.

A friend of mine always says: treat money with the attention and the respect it deserves; because money talks, and the first thing it says is “goodbye”.

The following superfoods are smart, low-calorie choices that will benefit your weight loss efforts: 

Green Tea – Researchers suspect that the catechins (helpful phytochemicals) in green tea may trigger weight loss by stimulating the body to burn calories and mildly decrease body fat. So indulge in either a hot cup or a nice tall iced glass of green tea.

Broth- or tomato-based soup – Soups can help reduce hunger before meals and increase your feeling of fullness. 

Low-calorie green salads – Having a low-calorie salad – which is not defined as one that’s loaded with croutons, high fat dressings, and cheese – as a first course can help you feel full, thereby reducing how much you eat with your main course.  Wisely choose your ingredients, and its high fiber content can be the key to helping you fight cravings later in the day.

Yogurt – Including dairy products as part of your healthy diet may promote your weight loss efforts.  Choosing a light yogurt may help you fight off hunger pangs due to its combination of protein and carbohydrate.

Beans – A great combination of fiber and protein, beans help you feel full longer, which means they may work to curb your between-meal appetite.

Water – Water is your body’s lifeblood, and you should be drinking it through your day. It’s a great no-calorie beverage, and you can get it by drinking unsweetened tea, flavored unsweetened mineral water, regular water with lime or lemon, or even in your cucumber.  In addition to helping flush toxins from the body, it can also help you feel full.  So when those hunger pangs strike, try drinking a glass of water before grabbing that snack.

High-Fiber, Whole-Grain Cereal – Whole grains in general help boost fiber and the nutritional value of your meal.  One of the easiest ways to give your daily diet a whole-grain boost is to have a bowl of higher-fiber whole-grain cereal as breakfast or a snack.

Superstitions are not based on knowledge or reason. People are superstitious, believing that certain things or rituals bring them good luck or help prevent bad luck. Celebrities are those who also have superstitions. Some take superstitions as practices and confidence to deal with the pressure to succeed. Their routine of choice is enhancing their performance. As a result, some perform better and achieve success.

 

Patrick Dempsey, known for his role as neurosurgeon Dr. Derek Shepherd on the medical drama Grey\’s Anatomy, has charmed many women. The Grey’s Anatomy heartthrob is very intelligent, confident, and talent. However, he believes that it is necessary to have a lucky charm by wearing his red Puma racing shoes. “I have to have red shoes no matter what. They\’re my lucky racing shoes”, said Patrick Dempsey.

 

Patrick Dempsey has to bring his red Puma shoes everywhere.

 

Christian Bale, whose starring roles are mostly in big budget Hollywood films, likes to provoke superstitions. While many people avoid going under the ladders, Christian chooses paths underneath them.

 

Christian first caught the public attention when casting in the starring role of Steven Spielberg\’s Empire of the Sun at the age of 13.

 


Michael Jordan
, an instrumental in popularizing the NBA around the world in the 1980s and 1990s, was known for a specific quirk. During his legendary career, this effectively marketed athlete of his generation wore his University of North Carolina shorts under his uniform in any games.

 

Michael Jordan led UNC to the NCAA Championships in 1982.

 

Kristin Chenoweth, best known on Broadway for her performances as Sally Brown in You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown (1999), is scared of walking under ladders. She explained that “So that lights never fall on me.”

 

Chenoweth at the 2008 Primetime Emmy Awards

 

Model and actor Seal Faris not only knocks on wood when hearing the unwanted things but also on his own head when he boasts about anything.

 

Seal Faris is best known for his roles as Jake Tyler in “Never Back Down” and Rick Penning in “Forever Strong”.

 

Angela Kinsey, currently the uptight accountant Angela Martin on the hit NBC television series The Office, gives the plan a little pat whenever she gets on a plane. She has done so since she was two years old and used to get scared of flying. Her father advised to her to give it a little pat to combat her fears of flying.

 

Kinsey is one of cast members of The Office to have a role in “License to Wed”

 

Tiger Woods often take on red on Sunday. Red is his lucky color. He took his mother’s advice on wearing red for luck and red is believed to be the most powerful color for Tiger Woods.

 

Tiger Woods is one of the most successful golfers of all time.

 

Ruth Brown used to follow theatrical superstitions including never saying the name of the play backstage, don’t bring peanuts backstage, never wish any luck, or never whistle backstage. Richard Chamberlain takes such superstitions very seriously.

 

Richard Chamberlain is an actor of stage and screen. Ruth Brown is an American pop and R&B singer and actress.

 

In the ancient times, the practice of crystal healing was popular. Richard Gere is just one of many celebrities who believe in the energy and healing power of crystals.

 

Richard Gere rose to prominence for his role in the film American Gigolo.

 

Singer and actress Jamie-Lynn Sigler, best known for her roe as Meadow Soprano on the HBO television series the Sopranos, follows many superstitions, especially when she performs in shows. She wears the same underwear.

 

Jamie-Lynn Sigler also appeared in the fifth season of the HBO series Entourage in October 2008.

 

Matthew Goode’s superstitions are mixed with sports. He always taps the ball the same number of times, looks at the ball, and taps again while playing cricket.

 

TV talk show host Star Jones says she never puts her purse on the floor.

 

Julie Walters kept a piece of cold in her bad on Oscar night instead of using charms or talismans to bring fortune and luck.

 

Julie Walters is an award-winning English actress and novelist.

 

Giada De Laurentiis, regular contributor and guest co-host on NBC’s Today, has two superstitions: no cats on the bed and spilling the salt. The reasons are that they will bring unlucky happenings. If a black cat lay on the bed of a sick man, he would die.

 

Giada De Laurentiis is currently the host of the current Food Network program Giada at Home.

 

Heiress Paris Hilton usually knocks on wood if someone says something she does not want to happen.

 

Related links:

Superstitions

Superstition Is Magical Thinking

Does Moon Really Influences Hair Growth? Truth Behind the Superstition

I am the fan of news on society and culture. I am currently the lecturer in social major. In free time, I am fond of reading articles and joining social activities.

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