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Illumination is the only thing that allows us to see what the environment looks like. It is the source of site, and as such, is a vital component of all visual arts. However light is more than a facilitator, it is actually a participant, with the interplay of bright and shadow heavily effecting how we perceive objects, whether it be a portrait, or an entire room.

If you walk into an environment and the lighting is dim, this automatically adds a certain quality to the space. Generally darker areas will be quieter, and more relaxed. We go to sleep in the dark, we are built to rest at night, and so the human body automatically reacts to dark situations with laid back lethargy.

In brighter environments the effect will be opposite. Well lit spaces tend to make people more vigorous and active. You will always find the lighting in an office building bright and abundant.

Light also tends to make people more self conscious. The more you can see, the more you can be seen, and this can cause some people to start worrying about how they appear. That’s is why bars, clubs, and parties are often only dimly illuminated; it is a way of helping people lower their guard and feel comfortable in the environment.

One thing to avoid when illuminating a space is going too far with light or darkness. Bathing a room in inky black will make it unusable, but making it so bright that it is irritating to the eyes is just as bad. You need to stay within the thin gradient of usable illumination for optimal effects.

Light is the source of sight. It makes everything in our lives visible. However it is more than just a way to see, illumination can actually effect how you see things, spaces, and people. It is important to consider these illuminated effects when decorating any environment.

This article was written by Jim, Slate on behalf of PebbleZ.com’s unique line of decorative candle holders. Crafted from various types of gemstone, and natural onyx, these attractive pieces are an elegant way to illuminate your life.

Illumination is the only thing that allows us to see what the environment looks like. It is the source of site, and as such, is a vital component of all visual arts. However light is more than a facilitator, it is actually a participant, with the interplay of bright and shadow heavily effecting how we perceive objects, whether it be a portrait, or an entire room.

If you walk into an environment and the lighting is dim, this automatically adds a certain quality to the space. Generally darker areas will be quieter, and more relaxed. We go to sleep in the dark, we are built to rest at night, and so the human body automatically reacts to dark situations with laid back lethargy.

In brighter environments the effect will be opposite. Well lit spaces tend to make people more vigorous and active. You will always find the lighting in an office building bright and abundant.

Light also tends to make people more self conscious. The more you can see, the more you can be seen, and this can cause some people to start worrying about how they appear. That’s is why bars, clubs, and parties are often only dimly illuminated; it is a way of helping people lower their guard and feel comfortable in the environment.

One thing to avoid when illuminating a space is going too far with light or darkness. Bathing a room in inky black will make it unusable, but making it so bright that it is irritating to the eyes is just as bad. You need to stay within the thin gradient of usable illumination for optimal effects.

Light is the source of sight. It makes everything in our lives visible. However it is more than just a way to see, illumination can actually effect how you see things, spaces, and people. It is important to consider these illuminated effects when decorating any environment.

In my research to develop a profitable strategy for networking on LinkedIn I discovered that the main problem with Linkedin is that most users are simply overwhelmed and intimidated, starting with the shear mass of options, tabs, and settings one needs to figure out in order to use the system.

And though the LinkedIn profile would seem pretty straight forward at first glance, most users quickly discover that they don’t really know what to do with it. The quickly become unsure of what kind of information to put in their profile or how to deliver that information effectively.

One of the biggest problems users encounter is that they simply don’t have a clue how to network in this unique online environment. Their efforts are further complicated by LinkedIn rules set up to protect users from abuse which make networking more difficult.

The most significant rule being that you aren’t supposed to invite anyone to connect with you unless you know them. This leaves most LinkedIn newcomers at a quandary as to how they can build their network and meet new people that will help them attain their goals and objectives.

Then there are also some very unsuspecting traps an innocent user can fall victim to. For example, LinkedIn provides the means to upload the existing contacts from your computer and other accounts you have around the web such as Yahoo, Facebook, and others.

Once uploaded, the system then invites you to send these people invitations to connect with you on LinkedIn. It seems perfectly logical, but when you do this, you will likely get slapped with “I don’t know you” (IDKs) from many of these people.

This occurs because we all have numerous “casual” contacts in our databases and on the other social media accounts. When invited, these people don’t always remember who you are. When they receive the unsolicited invitation and don’t recognize your name many will treat is as SPAM and slap you with the dreaded “IDK” (I don’t know you). Unfortunately, you only need a few of these IDKs and your account can be restricted from inviting anyone at all.

Finally, most of the information on using LinkedIn, including LinkedIn’s own Help Menus, trainings, and books all focus on “using” the system and hopelessly void of tactics and strategies aimed at brining you to opportunity.

The key to succeeding on LinkedIn is the proper application of networking, sales, and marketing strategies that conform to the rules and socially acceptable practices of the LinkedIn system.

For example, though LinkedIn states you aren’t supposed to invite people that you don’t know using their invitation system, there are many acceptable ways to engage others and get them to join your network that have no risk.

Additionally, understanding simple and easy ways to build the value of the connections you have, or use them to help you engage others is also a skill not taught in the user manuals and books currently out on the subject. Understanding how to answer questions, not the answer to the question, but the networking, relationship building, and business development aspects can be very valuable.

For an example of a specific strategy see the short video I put on YouTube discussing how to leverage the Questions and Answer forum to promote your own assets such as a website or blog: Link: http://www.onlinebusinessnetworker.net/llqa

Illumination is the only thing that allows us to see what the environment looks like. It is the source of site, and as such, is a vital component of all visual arts. However light is more than a facilitator, it is actually a participant, with the interplay of bright and shadow heavily effecting how we perceive objects, whether it be a portrait, or an entire room.

If you walk into an environment and the lighting is dim, this automatically adds a certain quality to the space. Generally darker areas will be quieter, and more relaxed. We go to sleep in the dark, we are built to rest at night, and so the human body automatically reacts to dark situations with laid back lethargy.

In brighter environments the effect will be opposite. Well lit spaces tend to make people more vigorous and active. You will always find the lighting in an office building bright and abundant.

Light also tends to make people more self conscious. The more you can see, the more you can be seen, and this can cause some people to start worrying about how they appear. That’s is why bars, clubs, and parties are often only dimly illuminated; it is a way of helping people lower their guard and feel comfortable in the environment.

One thing to avoid when illuminating a space is going too far with light or darkness. Bathing a room in inky black will make it unusable, but making it so bright that it is irritating to the eyes is just as bad. You need to stay within the thin gradient of usable illumination for optimal effects.

Light is the source of sight. It makes everything in our lives visible. However it is more than just a way to see, illumination can actually effect how you see things, spaces, and people. It is important to consider these illuminated effects when decorating any environment.

In my research to develop a profitable strategy for networking on LinkedIn I discovered that the main problem with Linkedin is that most users are simply overwhelmed and intimidated, starting with the shear mass of options, tabs, and settings one needs to figure out in order to use the system.

And though the LinkedIn profile would seem pretty straight forward at first glance, most users quickly discover that they don’t really know what to do with it. The quickly become unsure of what kind of information to put in their profile or how to deliver that information effectively.

One of the biggest problems users encounter is that they simply don’t have a clue how to network in this unique online environment. Their efforts are further complicated by LinkedIn rules set up to protect users from abuse which make networking more difficult.

The most significant rule being that you aren’t supposed to invite anyone to connect with you unless you know them. This leaves most LinkedIn newcomers at a quandary as to how they can build their network and meet new people that will help them attain their goals and objectives.

Then there are also some very unsuspecting traps an innocent user can fall victim to. For example, LinkedIn provides the means to upload the existing contacts from your computer and other accounts you have around the web such as Yahoo, Facebook, and others.

Once uploaded, the system then invites you to send these people invitations to connect with you on LinkedIn. It seems perfectly logical, but when you do this, you will likely get slapped with “I don’t know you” (IDKs) from many of these people.

This occurs because we all have numerous “casual” contacts in our databases and on the other social media accounts. When invited, these people don’t always remember who you are. When they receive the unsolicited invitation and don’t recognize your name many will treat is as SPAM and slap you with the dreaded “IDK” (I don’t know you). Unfortunately, you only need a few of these IDKs and your account can be restricted from inviting anyone at all.

Finally, most of the information on using LinkedIn, including LinkedIn’s own Help Menus, trainings, and books all focus on “using” the system and hopelessly void of tactics and strategies aimed at brining you to opportunity.

The key to succeeding on LinkedIn is the proper application of networking, sales, and marketing strategies that conform to the rules and socially acceptable practices of the LinkedIn system.

For example, though LinkedIn states you aren’t supposed to invite people that you don’t know using their invitation system, there are many acceptable ways to engage others and get them to join your network that have no risk.

Additionally, understanding simple and easy ways to build the value of the connections you have, or use them to help you engage others is also a skill not taught in the user manuals and books currently out on the subject. Understanding how to answer questions, not the answer to the question, but the networking, relationship building, and business development aspects can be very valuable.

Are you looking for a promotional item that will get you in everybody’s line of vision all year round? A custom calendar ensures your corporate logo is visible any time or any season of the year. Calendars are essential to our everyday lives-we use it to plan, to set schedules, to look forward, and to set goals.

Be a part of people’s future with Branders’ range of promotional desk and wall calendars. There’s a variety of themes such as lighthouse, sunset, patriotic, scenic, rainbow, and agriculture, to suit your brand’s positioning and your target market. Specialized themes cater to a specific segment. Those in car sales or in the automotive repair business can use the muscle cars theme to represent them, while nonprofit organizations and corporations will find the cause awareness calendar useful in promoting their fund-raising projects. Companies supportive of the fight against breast cancer can add their corporate logo to this custom stick-up calendar to inform clients and customers of their corporate social responsibility work.

Aside from building brand visibility, promotional calendars are a good vehicle to further an advocacy. Customizing your calendars with useful quotations from great thinkers and well-known figures or even little-known facts and figures will enhance your recipients’ knowledge.

Calendar magnets and weekly or monthly pocket planners enable you to build brand visibility in creative ways. While a desk or wall calendar remains in one place, a custom calendar-planner with your logo goes with your recipient everywhere, guaranteeing your brand longer exposure.
And don’t underestimate the pocket-size calendars-they always prove themselves useful during the offhand times they’re called upon.

Material should be a prime consideration when choosing calendars. These should be around for 12 long months, so you want your logo-imprinted custom calendar to hold up despite the wear and tear. Planners are especially prone to tear as they are used every day, so make sure you choose paper that’s durable and will stay long.

Calendars are best given out just before the year ends and the new year begins. While it’s easy to dismiss calendars, people will always find them useful any time of the year.

Remy is a Promotional Adviser specializing on Custom Calendars, Business Gift Items

Illumination is the only thing that allows us to see what the environment looks like. It is the source of site, and as such, is a vital component of all visual arts. However light is more than a facilitator, it is actually a participant, with the interplay of bright and shadow heavily effecting how we perceive objects, whether it be a portrait, or an entire room.

If you walk into an environment and the lighting is dim, this automatically adds a certain quality to the space. Generally darker areas will be quieter, and more relaxed. We go to sleep in the dark, we are built to rest at night, and so the human body automatically reacts to dark situations with laid back lethargy.

In brighter environments the effect will be opposite. Well lit spaces tend to make people more vigorous and active. You will always find the lighting in an office building bright and abundant.

Light also tends to make people more self conscious. The more you can see, the more you can be seen, and this can cause some people to start worrying about how they appear. That’s is why bars, clubs, and parties are often only dimly illuminated; it is a way of helping people lower their guard and feel comfortable in the environment.

One thing to avoid when illuminating a space is going too far with light or darkness. Bathing a room in inky black will make it unusable, but making it so bright that it is irritating to the eyes is just as bad. You need to stay within the thin gradient of usable illumination for optimal effects.

Light is the source of sight. It makes everything in our lives visible. However it is more than just a way to see, illumination can actually effect how you see things, spaces, and people. It is important to consider these illuminated effects when decorating any environment.

In my research to develop a profitable strategy for networking on LinkedIn I discovered that the main problem with Linkedin is that most users are simply overwhelmed and intimidated, starting with the shear mass of options, tabs, and settings one needs to figure out in order to use the system.

And though the LinkedIn profile would seem pretty straight forward at first glance, most users quickly discover that they don’t really know what to do with it. The quickly become unsure of what kind of information to put in their profile or how to deliver that information effectively.

One of the biggest problems users encounter is that they simply don’t have a clue how to network in this unique online environment. Their efforts are further complicated by LinkedIn rules set up to protect users from abuse which make networking more difficult.

The most significant rule being that you aren’t supposed to invite anyone to connect with you unless you know them. This leaves most LinkedIn newcomers at a quandary as to how they can build their network and meet new people that will help them attain their goals and objectives.

Then there are also some very unsuspecting traps an innocent user can fall victim to. For example, LinkedIn provides the means to upload the existing contacts from your computer and other accounts you have around the web such as Yahoo, Facebook, and others.

Once uploaded, the system then invites you to send these people invitations to connect with you on LinkedIn. It seems perfectly logical, but when you do this, you will likely get slapped with “I don’t know you” (IDKs) from many of these people.

This occurs because we all have numerous “casual” contacts in our databases and on the other social media accounts. When invited, these people don’t always remember who you are. When they receive the unsolicited invitation and don’t recognize your name many will treat is as SPAM and slap you with the dreaded “IDK” (I don’t know you). Unfortunately, you only need a few of these IDKs and your account can be restricted from inviting anyone at all.

Finally, most of the information on using LinkedIn, including LinkedIn’s own Help Menus, trainings, and books all focus on “using” the system and hopelessly void of tactics and strategies aimed at brining you to opportunity.

The key to succeeding on LinkedIn is the proper application of networking, sales, and marketing strategies that conform to the rules and socially acceptable practices of the LinkedIn system.

For example, though LinkedIn states you aren’t supposed to invite people that you don’t know using their invitation system, there are many acceptable ways to engage others and get them to join your network that have no risk.

Additionally, understanding simple and easy ways to build the value of the connections you have, or use them to help you engage others is also a skill not taught in the user manuals and books currently out on the subject. Understanding how to answer questions, not the answer to the question, but the networking, relationship building, and business development aspects can be very valuable.

Are you looking for a promotional item that will get you in everybody’s line of vision all year round? A custom calendar ensures your corporate logo is visible any time or any season of the year. Calendars are essential to our everyday lives-we use it to plan, to set schedules, to look forward, and to set goals.

Be a part of people’s future with Branders’ range of promotional desk and wall calendars. There’s a variety of themes such as lighthouse, sunset, patriotic, scenic, rainbow, and agriculture, to suit your brand’s positioning and your target market. Specialized themes cater to a specific segment. Those in car sales or in the automotive repair business can use the muscle cars theme to represent them, while nonprofit organizations and corporations will find the cause awareness calendar useful in promoting their fund-raising projects. Companies supportive of the fight against breast cancer can add their corporate logo to this custom stick-up calendar to inform clients and customers of their corporate social responsibility work.

Aside from building brand visibility, promotional calendars are a good vehicle to further an advocacy. Customizing your calendars with useful quotations from great thinkers and well-known figures or even little-known facts and figures will enhance your recipients’ knowledge.

Calendar magnets and weekly or monthly pocket planners enable you to build brand visibility in creative ways. While a desk or wall calendar remains in one place, a custom calendar-planner with your logo goes with your recipient everywhere, guaranteeing your brand longer exposure.
And don’t underestimate the pocket-size calendars-they always prove themselves useful during the offhand times they’re called upon.

Material should be a prime consideration when choosing calendars. These should be around for 12 long months, so you want your logo-imprinted custom calendar to hold up despite the wear and tear. Planners are especially prone to tear as they are used every day, so make sure you choose paper that’s durable and will stay long.

Calendars are best given out just before the year ends and the new year begins. While it’s easy to dismiss calendars, people will always find them useful any time of the year.

Last week I gave a presentation, for a distribution company, to about 35 of its dealer-customers. There was a limited amount of time so we compressed entirely too much material into a 75 minute presentation (a normal problem I seem to have). When the presentation was over, a number of the attendees complimented me on my enthusiasm and how passionate I seemed to be about the subjects covered. It made me remember a key to giving any presentation is the GUSTO with which it is delivered.

GUSTO is more than enthusiasm though…GUSTO, in my mind, also stands for: Genuine, Unconventional, Specific, Timely and Orchestrated. It is a set of ground rules I try to live by whenever I have to make a presentation to a group.

“Genuine” only works when you have a really good understanding of the audience. I try to learn as much about my audience as possible in advance (average age, experiences, personalities, are they business owners or sales persons, etc.). Then, if I can “put myself in their shoes” and approach the subject matter from a position that I know they understand and appreciate my communication and connection is much stronger. It seems much more genuine to them if the subject is approached from their perspective and with their goals in mind. Whenever possible, I try to use real-life examples to show relevance.

“Unconventional” is about doing something unexpected and unusual in the opening of the presentation, something that delivers the “hook” and immediately wows the audience or has them waiting to see what comes next. In this particular case, I was following a series of technical speakers, all of whom had important information that the audience had asked for but all of them were a bit bland and boring. I am sure that I was expected to open (like all of the other speakers” with, “hello, my name is …” but I had quickly arranged a set of stereo speakers and opened with a 95 second video accompanied by powerful and up-tempo music. The video was very unusual and definitely focused on creativity and unique, remarkable and contemporary change in the world around us. It also showed contrasts through a series of powerful “old VS new” images and suggested to the audience that it was time to develop some “new” in their processes and proposals to consumers. When the video was finished, and my Power Point presentation began, the first slide was proposing an answer to the last question in the video, “Are you ready?” The first slide said, “Let’s Get Ready!”

“Specific” is what happened next. I immediately walked into the audience and began asking questions of individual attendees. The questions were making sure that all of the audience were drawn into the presentation and had become a part of it. I was also making sure we had established a common ground and were all beginning this conversation from the same place. Because one of the video focuses had been on “old VS new”, the initial targets of questions were folks who appeared to have been in the industry for awhile. So the questions were about remembering where the industry had come from and how things had changed in the past. We were finding some common ground so that we all realized that just as there had been a lot of changes in the past we now needed to change again to accommodate a whole new group of consumers. We were getting ourselves into a mind set with reference to three areas of change needed for the future, changes in the approach to new business, changes in the process of acquiring new business and changes to the product to accommodate the needs of a new generation of buyers. Getting the audience to participate is critical when we remember one of the tenets of education; adults retain a very small portion of what they “hear”, a slightly larger portion of what they “see” but 90% of what they “do”. Now they were all involved.

“Timely” in this case, was about making sure the audience could see the need for a new and contemporary way of doing business. “Timely” was about presenting statistics and examples to show a new generation of consumers (in their industry) were much more sophisticated in their methods of learning and information-gathering then previous generations. Sometimes the audience needs to be shown that change is necessary and that perhaps the consumer has passed us by. I never shared any of my own qualifications until this time in my presentation.

“Orchestrated” is about making sure that everything goes smoothly and all the elements of my presentation blend with each other. It all has to look really “easy and smooth” to be effective. Some of this is common sense. I always come in early (the day before, in last week’s case) to check the venue and make sure my equipment is compatible with the AV equipment I am using. I make sure the seating arrangement works for my presentation. I make sure that if I have handouts, they will be striking, colorful and professional-looking. Does the hand-out tie to the slide presentation in look, color and feel? If I am going to ask the group to participate in an exercise (I try to do this as much as possible) I make sure they have pens or pencils and everything they need to be participants. And very much, I rehearse, rehearse and rehearse…to make sure I can make all of my points in the time I have allotted to me.

Making a successful presentation that really creates change is about a lot more than being a dynamic and powerful speaker it is about doing a presentation with GUSTO.

Ken Rogner, senior sales management consultant and sales educator. Ken can be reached at 708-205-6721 or at [email protected]

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