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Alright, so we know that “core” training is en vogue, from various fitness publications to hardcore powerliftrrs and bodybuilders to the oxygen channel, everyone is talking about how you should be training you “core”. Well the truth is that real CORE STRENGTH comes from the synergy of a bunch of different muscles working together (from your lats down to your hip complex and everything inbetween), namely to stabilize the spine. I know, I know, its all about “core stability” – but for combat athletes and strength freaks, we’re looking to go beyond planks and other more direct movements in favor of multi purpose movements that give us a huge bang for our buck. Squatting, deadlifting, lunging, chin ups are all great choices and should incorporated into everyone’s program in one form or another, but there is still a huge component missing from most people’s training!

The answer? Heavy single hand overhead work – namely strict presses and push presses. Simple clean a heavy dumbbell or kettlebell to your shoulder and press overhead – using leg drive if needed – while maintaining a rigid core. This movement alone will engage everything from your glutes to your lats, requiring your stabilizers to work overtime! Along with thrashing your pressing muscles (shoulder complex and triceps), these are a total body movement that will get you strong all over! Back in the days of the old time strongmen, you were not considered strong unless you could press HEAVY weights overhead.

Single hand dumbbell and kettlebell work were staples in those guys training programs! In addition to traditional dumbbells or kettlebells, i’ve recently added weight to my 24kg kettlebell by attaching 20lb chains to the handle. This makes the movement extremely difficult, with the chains swaying back and forth, your body has to work very hard to stabilze throughout the entire range of motion! Heavy single hand overhead work can serve as an awesome workout alone, maybe with some weighted pull ups thrown in for good measure, to work your entire musculature and multiple energy systems in one shot. That’s what I call training economy!

Here are my 3 favorite ways to do heavy dumbbell or kettlebell overhead work. With each of these options, rest periods will be limited, which is great for power endurance and lactic acid tolerance. For fighters or athletes looking to to just get leaner, mixing in some of these options would of huge benefit.

Option 1:
5×5
With a heavy dumbell or kettlebell, perform five presses or push presses with your left, switch, and immediately do 5 reps with your right side. Rest ONLY AS NEEDED, and try to get through all 5 sets as quickly as possible

Option 2:
Density Triples
Perform 3 reps each side on the minute for 5-10 minutes. Only add more load once you can get in all 30 reps in 10 minutes. Go HEAVY with this one.

Option 3:
20 singles
Ok, this is actually a clean and press on each rep, but that just means more muscle is being used (not a bad thing!). You’re going to perform 1 left with your left, put the weight down, then one rep with your right. The goal is to get through all 20 reps in 5 minutes or less. This is awesome for fighters and the like as it replicates non stop explosive efforts over a relatively short period of time.

So grab some weights and throw that sucker overhead!

Dustin Lebel

Alright, so we know that “core” training is en vogue, from various fitness publications to hardcore powerliftrrs and bodybuilders to the oxygen channel, everyone is talking about how you should be training you “core”. Well the truth is that real CORE STRENGTH comes from the synergy of a bunch of different muscles working together (from your lats down to your hip complex and everything inbetween), namely to stabilize the spine. I know, I know, its all about “core stability” – but for combat athletes and strength freaks, we’re looking to go beyond planks and other more direct movements in favor of multi purpose movements that give us a huge bang for our buck. Squatting, deadlifting, lunging, chin ups are all great choices and should incorporated into everyone’s program in one form or another, but there is still a huge component missing from most people’s training!

The answer? Heavy single hand overhead work – namely strict presses and push presses. Simple clean a heavy dumbbell or kettlebell to your shoulder and press overhead – using leg drive if needed – while maintaining a rigid core. This movement alone will engage everything from your glutes to your lats, requiring your stabilizers to work overtime! Along with thrashing your pressing muscles (shoulder complex and triceps), these are a total body movement that will get you strong all over! Back in the days of the old time strongmen, you were not considered strong unless you could press HEAVY weights overhead.

Single hand dumbbell and kettlebell work were staples in those guys training programs! In addition to traditional dumbbells or kettlebells, i’ve recently added weight to my 24kg kettlebell by attaching 20lb chains to the handle. This makes the movement extremely difficult, with the chains swaying back and forth, your body has to work very hard to stabilze throughout the entire range of motion! Heavy single hand overhead work can serve as an awesome workout alone, maybe with some weighted pull ups thrown in for good measure, to work your entire musculature and multiple energy systems in one shot. That’s what I call training economy!

Here are my 3 favorite ways to do heavy dumbbell or kettlebell overhead work. With each of these options, rest periods will be limited, which is great for power endurance and lactic acid tolerance. For fighters or athletes looking to to just get leaner, mixing in some of these options would of huge benefit.

Option 1:
5×5
With a heavy dumbell or kettlebell, perform five presses or push presses with your left, switch, and immediately do 5 reps with your right side. Rest ONLY AS NEEDED, and try to get through all 5 sets as quickly as possible

Option 2:
Density Triples
Perform 3 reps each side on the minute for 5-10 minutes. Only add more load once you can get in all 30 reps in 10 minutes. Go HEAVY with this one.

Option 3:
20 singles
Ok, this is actually a clean and press on each rep, but that just means more muscle is being used (not a bad thing!). You’re going to perform 1 left with your left, put the weight down, then one rep with your right. The goal is to get through all 20 reps in 5 minutes or less. This is awesome for fighters and the like as it replicates non stop explosive efforts over a relatively short period of time.

So grab some weights and throw that sucker overhead!

Core training has become a buzz word in the fitness and personal training industry. We see it in magazine, books, training videos, and we hear it coming out of the mouths of personal trainers and fitness professionals everyday.

Everyone wants a strong core and flat abs. If your back hurts, strengthen your core. Do more core work to burn belly fat. There are many myths and loose theories out there as to how you properly train your core, and what the core actually is.

First and foremost I want to discuss the anatomy of the “core” and what muscles we are talking about when we use this ever so common word. Many times when people think of the core they think about the abdominal muscles only. The core of the human body is made up of many muscles, small and large, that provide stability, balance, power, strength, and movement.

For the sake of this article let’s keep the anatomy simple and avoid getting into small groups of certain muscles. The core includes:
• Abdominals
• Lower Back (Erector Spinae)
• Oblique Muscles (rotators)
• Hip Flexors
• Hamstrings
• Gluteus
• Quadriceps

There are several sub areas of each of these muscle groups but this gives you the general idea of just how much is involved with core movement and strengthening. The core is the gateway to all power and strength. Think of your body as a chain. If there is a weak link in any part of the chain, maximum effort in a given movement cannot be achieved. When you perform a squat you must transfer energy from the floor through your lower body and eventually through your core in order to get to the standing position.
If your lower body is strong but the abdominals or lower back piece of the chain is weak, your squat movement will be less than desired. In that same scenario if you have very little gluteal activation, as you progress through your squat, your lower back muscles will have to take over to overcome the force of the movement. They are going to be stressed more than necessary and this can lead to injury. Having a strong and balanced core is the key to any exercise and will help you see progress in any training program regardless of your goals.

In order to strengthen the core, I take the same approach as I do for any other muscle group or movement. Work the muscles together and avoid isolation. Basic crunches will do nothing for your overall development. An isolated spinal flexion movement is really unnecessary because you are not recruiting any of the synergist muscles around that particular joint area.

Think of the core training like training any other area. Would you do 100 squats with no weight except your own bodyweight? Probably not because it would take a ton of time and would be of little value. So why would you do 100 crunches with no weight? The abdominals and the entire core region need to be taxed and pushed through strength movements.

Here are a few of my favorite basic core training exercises. The movements can be done in a gym setting or at home because they require little equipment. These movements all have the same principles of my athletic fitness programs; look for efficient and effective movements, burn a lot of calories, recruit large muscle groups to tax the nervous system and elevate metabolism, and move your body the way it was meant to move.

1. Dumbbell/Kettle bell Sit Ups
2. Standing Band Crunches
3. Medicine Ball Rotation Throws
4. Cable Rotations (straight arm for more difficulty)
5. Ab Wheel- the “evil wheel”
6. BB Dead lifts
7. BB or DB Squats
8. Glute Ham Raises
9. Hanging Knee Raises
10. Overhead Carries (DB, KB, Sandbag, or any heavy object)

Any large movement will immediately tax the core muscles but this gives you an idea of some exercises that you can incorporate into your training plan. Whether your goals are to overcome a recent injury, lose body fat and get lean, train for an athletic event, or just to become fitter, the athletic mindset of core training is the most effective and efficient. Look at the top athletes in most sports. They are strong, fit, lean, explosive, and healthy. Why wouldn’t we want to train like that?

Callie Durbrow is a strength coach and personal trainer to many clients in the Boston and Medford Massachusetts area. She currently trains clients to lose body fat, gain strength, and challenge their bodies with each session.
Her training style is based around athletic performance principles and functional movements.

Alright, so we know that “core” training is en vogue, from various fitness publications to hardcore powerliftrrs and bodybuilders to the oxygen channel, everyone is talking about how you should be training you “core”. Well the truth is that real CORE STRENGTH comes from the synergy of a bunch of different muscles working together (from your lats down to your hip complex and everything inbetween), namely to stabilize the spine. I know, I know, its all about “core stability” – but for combat athletes and strength freaks, we’re looking to go beyond planks and other more direct movements in favor of multi purpose movements that give us a huge bang for our buck. Squatting, deadlifting, lunging, chin ups are all great choices and should incorporated into everyone’s program in one form or another, but there is still a huge component missing from most people’s training!

The answer? Heavy single hand overhead work – namely strict presses and push presses. Simple clean a heavy dumbbell or kettlebell to your shoulder and press overhead – using leg drive if needed – while maintaining a rigid core. This movement alone will engage everything from your glutes to your lats, requiring your stabilizers to work overtime! Along with thrashing your pressing muscles (shoulder complex and triceps), these are a total body movement that will get you strong all over! Back in the days of the old time strongmen, you were not considered strong unless you could press HEAVY weights overhead.

Single hand dumbbell and kettlebell work were staples in those guys training programs! In addition to traditional dumbbells or kettlebells, i’ve recently added weight to my 24kg kettlebell by attaching 20lb chains to the handle. This makes the movement extremely difficult, with the chains swaying back and forth, your body has to work very hard to stabilze throughout the entire range of motion! Heavy single hand overhead work can serve as an awesome workout alone, maybe with some weighted pull ups thrown in for good measure, to work your entire musculature and multiple energy systems in one shot. That’s what I call training economy!

Here are my 3 favorite ways to do heavy dumbbell or kettlebell overhead work. With each of these options, rest periods will be limited, which is great for power endurance and lactic acid tolerance. For fighters or athletes looking to to just get leaner, mixing in some of these options would of huge benefit.

Option 1:
5×5
With a heavy dumbell or kettlebell, perform five presses or push presses with your left, switch, and immediately do 5 reps with your right side. Rest ONLY AS NEEDED, and try to get through all 5 sets as quickly as possible

Option 2:
Density Triples
Perform 3 reps each side on the minute for 5-10 minutes. Only add more load once you can get in all 30 reps in 10 minutes. Go HEAVY with this one.

Option 3:
20 singles
Ok, this is actually a clean and press on each rep, but that just means more muscle is being used (not a bad thing!). You’re going to perform 1 left with your left, put the weight down, then one rep with your right. The goal is to get through all 20 reps in 5 minutes or less. This is awesome for fighters and the like as it replicates non stop explosive efforts over a relatively short period of time.

So grab some weights and throw that sucker overhead!

Core training has become a buzz word in the fitness and personal training industry. We see it in magazine, books, training videos, and we hear it coming out of the mouths of personal trainers and fitness professionals everyday.

Everyone wants a strong core and flat abs. If your back hurts, strengthen your core. Do more core work to burn belly fat. There are many myths and loose theories out there as to how you properly train your core, and what the core actually is.

First and foremost I want to discuss the anatomy of the “core” and what muscles we are talking about when we use this ever so common word. Many times when people think of the core they think about the abdominal muscles only. The core of the human body is made up of many muscles, small and large, that provide stability, balance, power, strength, and movement.

For the sake of this article let’s keep the anatomy simple and avoid getting into small groups of certain muscles. The core includes:
• Abdominals
• Lower Back (Erector Spinae)
• Oblique Muscles (rotators)
• Hip Flexors
• Hamstrings
• Gluteus
• Quadriceps

There are several sub areas of each of these muscle groups but this gives you the general idea of just how much is involved with core movement and strengthening. The core is the gateway to all power and strength. Think of your body as a chain. If there is a weak link in any part of the chain, maximum effort in a given movement cannot be achieved. When you perform a squat you must transfer energy from the floor through your lower body and eventually through your core in order to get to the standing position.
If your lower body is strong but the abdominals or lower back piece of the chain is weak, your squat movement will be less than desired. In that same scenario if you have very little gluteal activation, as you progress through your squat, your lower back muscles will have to take over to overcome the force of the movement. They are going to be stressed more than necessary and this can lead to injury. Having a strong and balanced core is the key to any exercise and will help you see progress in any training program regardless of your goals.

In order to strengthen the core, I take the same approach as I do for any other muscle group or movement. Work the muscles together and avoid isolation. Basic crunches will do nothing for your overall development. An isolated spinal flexion movement is really unnecessary because you are not recruiting any of the synergist muscles around that particular joint area.

Think of the core training like training any other area. Would you do 100 squats with no weight except your own bodyweight? Probably not because it would take a ton of time and would be of little value. So why would you do 100 crunches with no weight? The abdominals and the entire core region need to be taxed and pushed through strength movements.

Here are a few of my favorite basic core training exercises. The movements can be done in a gym setting or at home because they require little equipment. These movements all have the same principles of my athletic fitness programs; look for efficient and effective movements, burn a lot of calories, recruit large muscle groups to tax the nervous system and elevate metabolism, and move your body the way it was meant to move.

1. Dumbbell/Kettle bell Sit Ups
2. Standing Band Crunches
3. Medicine Ball Rotation Throws
4. Cable Rotations (straight arm for more difficulty)
5. Ab Wheel- the “evil wheel”
6. BB Dead lifts
7. BB or DB Squats
8. Glute Ham Raises
9. Hanging Knee Raises
10. Overhead Carries (DB, KB, Sandbag, or any heavy object)

Any large movement will immediately tax the core muscles but this gives you an idea of some exercises that you can incorporate into your training plan. Whether your goals are to overcome a recent injury, lose body fat and get lean, train for an athletic event, or just to become fitter, the athletic mindset of core training is the most effective and efficient. Look at the top athletes in most sports. They are strong, fit, lean, explosive, and healthy. Why wouldn’t we want to train like that?

The purpose of this article is to show you how important it is to strengthen you core muscles in order to jump higher faster. After reading this article one should be able to determine what core muscles to workout and how then can help to increase your vertical leaping ability.

When I first started to research online I found a lot of programs out there that promised to increase your vertical leap. And a lot of them worked! however unfortunately a lot of the didn’t either. And after years of research it still bothers me to this day to see how so many are training incorrectly or are just simply not getting the most out of there workouts.

Your core is one of the most important sections of your body to include into your jumping workout routine. Your core is important because it provides you with stability, and in addition it also helps you with the swinging of yours as you jump to gain momentum. The more stable you are when you take off the more power and lift you are able to generate when you jump.

Some great exercises for working out your core are back extensions, sit ups, crunches, and reverse crunches. Be sure to include these exercises into your routing if you are not doing them already in order to get the best results, as far as increasing your jumping ability is concerned.

In conclusion working out your core is an important to increase you vertical and ensure maximum gains.

Additionally you want to make sure that you don’t also forget about your upper body as well. Although you core is important to focus on it’s only one detail out of many that need attention as well.

Moreover you not only want to work on getting muscles stronger you also want to work on explosiveness. You can be the strongest man in the world but that doesn’t mean anything once you get on the court.

I used to not have any hops and was ugly. Now…I’m just ugly. Want to know what program I used to jump off the planet? Check out http://jumphigherfaster.blogspot.com to find out how you can add 10 inches to your vertical guaranteed.

Alright, so we know that “core” training is en vogue, from various fitness publications to hardcore powerliftrrs and bodybuilders to the oxygen channel, everyone is talking about how you should be training you “core”. Well the truth is that real CORE STRENGTH comes from the synergy of a bunch of different muscles working together (from your lats down to your hip complex and everything inbetween), namely to stabilize the spine. I know, I know, its all about “core stability” – but for combat athletes and strength freaks, we’re looking to go beyond planks and other more direct movements in favor of multi purpose movements that give us a huge bang for our buck. Squatting, deadlifting, lunging, chin ups are all great choices and should incorporated into everyone’s program in one form or another, but there is still a huge component missing from most people’s training!

The answer? Heavy single hand overhead work – namely strict presses and push presses. Simple clean a heavy dumbbell or kettlebell to your shoulder and press overhead – using leg drive if needed – while maintaining a rigid core. This movement alone will engage everything from your glutes to your lats, requiring your stabilizers to work overtime! Along with thrashing your pressing muscles (shoulder complex and triceps), these are a total body movement that will get you strong all over! Back in the days of the old time strongmen, you were not considered strong unless you could press HEAVY weights overhead.

Single hand dumbbell and kettlebell work were staples in those guys training programs! In addition to traditional dumbbells or kettlebells, i’ve recently added weight to my 24kg kettlebell by attaching 20lb chains to the handle. This makes the movement extremely difficult, with the chains swaying back and forth, your body has to work very hard to stabilze throughout the entire range of motion! Heavy single hand overhead work can serve as an awesome workout alone, maybe with some weighted pull ups thrown in for good measure, to work your entire musculature and multiple energy systems in one shot. That’s what I call training economy!

Here are my 3 favorite ways to do heavy dumbbell or kettlebell overhead work. With each of these options, rest periods will be limited, which is great for power endurance and lactic acid tolerance. For fighters or athletes looking to to just get leaner, mixing in some of these options would of huge benefit.

Option 1:
5×5
With a heavy dumbell or kettlebell, perform five presses or push presses with your left, switch, and immediately do 5 reps with your right side. Rest ONLY AS NEEDED, and try to get through all 5 sets as quickly as possible

Option 2:
Density Triples
Perform 3 reps each side on the minute for 5-10 minutes. Only add more load once you can get in all 30 reps in 10 minutes. Go HEAVY with this one.

Option 3:
20 singles
Ok, this is actually a clean and press on each rep, but that just means more muscle is being used (not a bad thing!). You’re going to perform 1 left with your left, put the weight down, then one rep with your right. The goal is to get through all 20 reps in 5 minutes or less. This is awesome for fighters and the like as it replicates non stop explosive efforts over a relatively short period of time.

So grab some weights and throw that sucker overhead!

Core training has become a buzz word in the fitness and personal training industry. We see it in magazine, books, training videos, and we hear it coming out of the mouths of personal trainers and fitness professionals everyday.

Everyone wants a strong core and flat abs. If your back hurts, strengthen your core. Do more core work to burn belly fat. There are many myths and loose theories out there as to how you properly train your core, and what the core actually is.

First and foremost I want to discuss the anatomy of the “core” and what muscles we are talking about when we use this ever so common word. Many times when people think of the core they think about the abdominal muscles only. The core of the human body is made up of many muscles, small and large, that provide stability, balance, power, strength, and movement.

For the sake of this article let’s keep the anatomy simple and avoid getting into small groups of certain muscles. The core includes:
• Abdominals
• Lower Back (Erector Spinae)
• Oblique Muscles (rotators)
• Hip Flexors
• Hamstrings
• Gluteus
• Quadriceps

There are several sub areas of each of these muscle groups but this gives you the general idea of just how much is involved with core movement and strengthening. The core is the gateway to all power and strength. Think of your body as a chain. If there is a weak link in any part of the chain, maximum effort in a given movement cannot be achieved. When you perform a squat you must transfer energy from the floor through your lower body and eventually through your core in order to get to the standing position.
If your lower body is strong but the abdominals or lower back piece of the chain is weak, your squat movement will be less than desired. In that same scenario if you have very little gluteal activation, as you progress through your squat, your lower back muscles will have to take over to overcome the force of the movement. They are going to be stressed more than necessary and this can lead to injury. Having a strong and balanced core is the key to any exercise and will help you see progress in any training program regardless of your goals.

In order to strengthen the core, I take the same approach as I do for any other muscle group or movement. Work the muscles together and avoid isolation. Basic crunches will do nothing for your overall development. An isolated spinal flexion movement is really unnecessary because you are not recruiting any of the synergist muscles around that particular joint area.

Think of the core training like training any other area. Would you do 100 squats with no weight except your own bodyweight? Probably not because it would take a ton of time and would be of little value. So why would you do 100 crunches with no weight? The abdominals and the entire core region need to be taxed and pushed through strength movements.

Here are a few of my favorite basic core training exercises. The movements can be done in a gym setting or at home because they require little equipment. These movements all have the same principles of my athletic fitness programs; look for efficient and effective movements, burn a lot of calories, recruit large muscle groups to tax the nervous system and elevate metabolism, and move your body the way it was meant to move.

1. Dumbbell/Kettle bell Sit Ups
2. Standing Band Crunches
3. Medicine Ball Rotation Throws
4. Cable Rotations (straight arm for more difficulty)
5. Ab Wheel- the “evil wheel”
6. BB Dead lifts
7. BB or DB Squats
8. Glute Ham Raises
9. Hanging Knee Raises
10. Overhead Carries (DB, KB, Sandbag, or any heavy object)

Any large movement will immediately tax the core muscles but this gives you an idea of some exercises that you can incorporate into your training plan. Whether your goals are to overcome a recent injury, lose body fat and get lean, train for an athletic event, or just to become fitter, the athletic mindset of core training is the most effective and efficient. Look at the top athletes in most sports. They are strong, fit, lean, explosive, and healthy. Why wouldn’t we want to train like that?

The purpose of this article is to show you how important it is to strengthen you core muscles in order to jump higher faster. After reading this article one should be able to determine what core muscles to workout and how then can help to increase your vertical leaping ability.

When I first started to research online I found a lot of programs out there that promised to increase your vertical leap. And a lot of them worked! however unfortunately a lot of the didn’t either. And after years of research it still bothers me to this day to see how so many are training incorrectly or are just simply not getting the most out of there workouts.

Your core is one of the most important sections of your body to include into your jumping workout routine. Your core is important because it provides you with stability, and in addition it also helps you with the swinging of yours as you jump to gain momentum. The more stable you are when you take off the more power and lift you are able to generate when you jump.

Some great exercises for working out your core are back extensions, sit ups, crunches, and reverse crunches. Be sure to include these exercises into your routing if you are not doing them already in order to get the best results, as far as increasing your jumping ability is concerned.

In conclusion working out your core is an important to increase you vertical and ensure maximum gains.

Additionally you want to make sure that you don’t also forget about your upper body as well. Although you core is important to focus on it’s only one detail out of many that need attention as well.

Moreover you not only want to work on getting muscles stronger you also want to work on explosiveness. You can be the strongest man in the world but that doesn’t mean anything once you get on the court.

Abs, core, stomach area, or waistline take your pick with the name of the area between your chest and your hips. This is the basic part of the body that most people are unhappy with when it comes down to their appearance. Well, never fear because there is a way around that obstacle you call a belly. Permit yourself a minute to read the following 2 drills that you can implement in order to help you to spike your metabolism to burn fat, to help harden that troublesome area, and to get you stronger in the process!

1. Walkout Planks: This is an interesting and dynamic drill that involves you having to really utilize your entire body while forcing your core muscles to stabilize you in the process. To begin, stand with your feet about shoulder width apart. From here simply crouch down and place your hands on the ground in front of you. With your hands on the ground and keeping your feet in the same spot walkout on your hands until your body is fully extended into an upright push-up position.

From here simply lower yourself down onto your forearms with your body suspended above the ground in a plank position. This is where you will experience the tension on your abs. From here simply reverse the whole process by pushing yourself back up into an upright push-up position and walking yourself back to a standing position. All of this consist of a single repetition. For starters, attempt to execute about 10 of these before resting. You will quickly see how fat-loss and six pack abs are a possibility with this drill!

2. Walkout Plank Push-Ups: This drill is basically performed the same exact way as the normal walkout planks with the exception that you will perform a standard push-up in the process. The push-up in this drill is included at the point when you are coming out of the plank after extending yourself on the ground. Before reversing the whole process to walk back to a standing position execute a standard push-up first. After the push-up then walk yourself back to the standing position. This added move will certainly promote additional intensity to the drill thereby helping you along your journey of getting ripped! Give it a try.

To learn more about Kettlebells, Fitness, and achieving Total Mind-Blowing Strength come and visit me at: http://www.efandps.com
To be one of my members and to receive more tips on INSANE BODY CONSTRUCTION please visit me at: http://www.efandps.com/www.efandps.com/Brandons_Members_Newsletter.html
I’m Brandon Richey the Strength and Conditioning Pro!

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